LPC Supervision

As a part of a standard audit by the licensing board, I had to provide a synopsis of the style of supervision I provide to clinicians who are seeking their license. I might as well post it here as well:

My primary identification regarding a treatment modality is gestalt. Gestalt can be viewed as a synergistic interplay between existential phenomenology, systemic, cognitive behavioral, and humanistic modes of psychotherapy.

Respectively, I help the supervisee gain greater sensitivity to the clients’ response to the human condition and fears of death and loss, patterns and forces inherent in context and family of origin, the way thoughts/beliefs affect mood/behavior, and the natural aspirations towards an actualized self and self-preservation.

There is a strong emphasis on *self-of-therapist*. This is due to the belief that the self is the most effective instrument of therapy. I value authenticity and transparency and, even if the supervisee does not wish to prioritize these aspects in their work, I help them see how their “self” will come out in their “work” whether they’d like it to or not. Therefore I discourage compartmentalization of self-as-therapist against the rest of one’s life. I encourage an integration *self* and *therapist* so their work is a graceful extension of a clear world-view and a true desire to be of service (as opposed to a harmful counter-transference and/or a stagnating hypocrisy).

I do not encourage supervisees to identify with gestalt. Rather, I encourage supervisees to identify with (and intensely study) the theories that make the most sense to them and what will bring out the gifts, talents, and strengths of their personality. I do not discuss techniques. I encourage the deeper striving towards mastery of theory. Throughout the course of supervision, I employ the concepts (per Carl Whitaker) of the Battle for Structure and the Battle for Initiative. These concepts are applicable to any school of thought – any style of therapy – any interpersonal relation.

Battle for Structure: we look at how every behavior of the therapist is a creative act that builds the structure of the therapy relationship. I want therapists to build the structure deliberately. This, again, is universal across the different styles of therapy. Therapists choose the structure they’d like to create based on the theory from which they’re operating.

Battle for Initiative: we look at how the goal of the therapy is for the client to be successfully discharged and have no further need for the therapist. I want therapists to be deliberate about how they help the client tap into their own creativity. We want to leave clients excited about and invested in the creation of the remainder of their lives. We are careful not to create a dependence on the therapist. This, again, is universal across the different styles of therapy. Therapists will choose how they go about this depending on their school of thought.

 

In sum, I help therapists develop their ability to:

(1) Theory: Understand why things are happening the way they are.

(2) Battle For Structure: Be aware of and deliberate about the structure of the relationship they’re creating.

(3) Battle For Initiative: Be aware of and deliberate about bringing forth the client’s creativity.

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